Ella Baker Center for Human Rights Set to Premiere Juvenile Justice Film

In the United States, 90,000 youth find themselves in juvenile detention centers on any given night and 2.2 million youth are arrested each year.  In California, the state youth prison systems costs $216,000 per child per year while a mere $8,000 per child is allocated to Oakland public schools. It’s time for California to adjust its priorities and adopt a new approach.
 
The Ella Baker Center for Human Rights is premiering a new film  Learning from Our Mistakes: Transforming Juvenile Justice in California Tuesday, July 20, 2010 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM Nile Hall, Preservation Park, Oakland, CA (668 13th St., Oakland, CA 94612). Invited guests on hand for the premiere include: elected officials, formerly incarcerated youth, Santa Clara Chief Probation Officer, and Hattie Tate, Principal, Dewey Academy in Oakland.
 
Watch the movie
 
WHAT: Learning from Our Mistakes Movie Premiere
WHEN: Tuesday, July 20th, 6:30-8:30 PM
WHERE: Nile Hall, Preservation Park, Oakland, CA (668 13th St., Oakland, CA 94612)
WHO: Ella Baker Center for Human Rights, Hayward Burns Institute, Annie E. Casey Foundation (Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative)
 
“There is no doubt that our juvenile justice system is expensive, ineffective, and broken,” said Jakada Imani of the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights, “But there is a better way. We could save money and young people’s lives by reforming our system to one that truly rehabilitates.”
 
James Y. was locked up in the DJJ for 5 years and was just released a few weeks ago. He is looking forward to participating in next Tuesday’s unveiling.
 
 “The environment they lock you up in for rehabilitation is poison.” said James,  “From my firsthand experience, positive changes in the system can only be brought by love, family, support and respect--things the DJJ can't provide.”
 
Learning from Our Mistakes: Transforming Juvenile Justice demonstrates that we can redirect the school to prison pipeline that results in the disparate lock up of youth of color and provide rehabilitative care for youth who have gotten in the most serious trouble. By Learning from Our Mistakes, we can now lead the nation in transforming juvenile justice systems to lift youth up rather than locking them down.